About cooking

Most people consume too much salt—on average 9–12 grams per day, or around twice the recommended maximum intake.[1] Recent years have also seen an evolution in cooking, moving from almost entirely raw ingredients to convenience foods now widely available.[2] However, food prepared at home tends to be more nutritious than that prepared in public places, and healthier dietary variety can be achieved by those who regularly cook from fresh or raw ingredients.[3]

 

“Is there any practice less selfish, any time less wasted, than preparing something delicious and nourishing for the people you love.”

– Michael Pollan

 

Michael Pollan has been researching food production and preparation for many years and has published several award winning books. He argues that these days many people don’t know where food comes from, how it is made or how it was grown.[4] Besides that, we don’t really know what happens to our body when we consume certain foods. What predicts a healthy diet more than anything else is the fact that it is cooked by a human being.

Robin Fox analyses the role of food in our lives from an anthropological perspective. He states that all animals eat, but we are the only animal that cooks. So cooking becomes more than a necessity, it is the symbol of our humanity, what marks us off from the rest of nature.[6]

 

References:

[1] http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs393/en/

[2] Engler-Stringer, R. (2010). Food, cooking skills, and health: a literature review. Canadian journal of Dietetic practice and research, 71(3):141–145.

[3] Caraher,M.,Dixon,P.,Lang,T.,andCarr-Hill,R.(1999).Thestateofcookinginengland:therelation- ship of cooking skills to food choice. British food journal, 101(8):590–609.

[5] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TX7kwfE3cJQ

[5] Caraher,M.,Dixon,P.,Lang,T.,andCarr-Hill,R.(1999).Thestateofcookinginengland:therelation- ship of cooking skills to food choice. British food journal, 101(8):590–609.

[6] Food and Eating: an Anthropological Perspective. Social Issues Research Centre. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.sirc.org/publik/foxfood.pdf. [Accessed 08 March 2016].




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